Category Archives: Keeping up with BASES

Women in Entrepreneurship: Q&A with Julia Hartz, Cofounder, Eventbrite

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This year, BASES hosted its inaugural Women in Entrepreneurship Summit (WiE). The event took place on Saturday, April 4 at the Obendorf Event Center at the Graduate School of Business. Delivering the keynote speech was Julia Hartz, Cofounder and President of Eventbrite. During her keynote speech, Hartz shared her story on how she developed as an undergraduate to becoming one of Fortune’s Ten Most Powerful Women Entrepreneurs in 2013. Along with describing her experiences, she gave young women entrepreneurs valuable advice on how to be successful in their own careers.

We had the pleasure of following-up with Hartz after the event to hear more about her experience at BASES’ inaugural WiE.

Q: What inspired you to partake in the BASES’ Women In Entrepreneurship Summit this past month, offering your own time as well as your own personal story to drive discussion regarding the current representation of women in the business world?
A: I believe that you can’t be it if you can’t see it.  So much of my inspiration comes from seeing women who are challenging themselves to be great entrepreneurs and live a full life.  I’m inspired to pay it forward in any way I can find to connect with other women who have big dreams.

Q: Many entrepreneurs share their stories widely through a variety of channels and mediums, often to very large audiences. How valuable did you consider the intimate format of the WIE summit, and how did you take advantage of such a personal interaction with entrepreneurial students.
A: I think the summit offers a very unique opportunity for entrepreneurs to meet with each other in a different forum than is commonly used. I like the accessibility this affords and the depth of targeted conversations.

Q: The Summit is designed to offer students a personal and unique opportunity to interact with female leaders in business and to walk away with greater knowledge and confidence of the business world. On your end, were you able to learn and/or notice anything from your interactions with the crowd during the Q&A portion? If so, we’d love to hear about it!
AAbsolutely! I was struck by how insightful the questions were, and I wish we had time for more.  The audience seemed incredibly engaged, which is truly rewarding as a guest.

Q: Lastly, coming away from your experience at the Summit, what is the one final message you would want to give to not only young female entrepreneurs, but also to young entrepreneurs as a whole?
A: Don’t let fear rule your decision to take the leap into entrepreneurship!

Thank you Julia Hartz. We had an incredible inaugural event and look forward to next year’s WiE.

For more opportunities to meet founders and Stanford alumni in technology, please attend our BASES Challenge Finale on Friday, May 8 at the Stanford Arrillaga Alumni Center beginning at 2 PM. For more details on BASES Challenge and Finale, visit our website here. To RSVP, go here. 

Women in Entrepreneurship Summit: Changing the 13% of Women-Led Startups

By Stephany Yong

I love startups.

Now before you let out a sigh and roll your eyes at just another Stanford student with startup fever, hear me out.

I remember the first time I set foot into StartX my freshman year. It was the third week of winter quarter, and I was set to meet Kyle, the founder of a startup called Pixlee, whom I had met at the BASES career fair the week before. Walking through the floor space to the room where the interview would be held, I took note of the interesting set up, with tables forming clusters of makeshift offices for the startups housed there.

It was unlike any office space I had ever seen – there were nerf gun bullets and swivel office chairs strewn across the floor, whiteboard paint walls with customer acquisition strategies half mapped out in marker. And another glaring thing – I was the only girl in the building that afternoon.

Over the next few months, I dove headfirst and worked there part time on marketing when I wasn’t in class. The experience transformed me and how I viewed myself and my work. I loved how I was making an impact, preparing sales decks, writing blog posts, and consulting with the CEO on my projects (of a 10-person company at the time but still pretty cool). Furthermore, I adopted a fascination with shipping and building things. At Pixlee, three engineers had built a service that delighted hundreds of thousands of people around the world. It inspired me to get more serious about my first computer science class, and ultimately, pursue a degree in computer science.

My first foray (if you can call it that) into entrepreneurship opened up an entirely new world to me. The environment was infectious, marked by cheeto-stained keyboards and standing desks, but more importantly, a scrappy and growth-driven mindset that made me want to improve, be sharper, and learn more about the space by asking good questions. When thrown into an unstructured setting, I was forced to find a way to add value to the team, and now it’s a skill I want to continue to improve over my career. But looking around me at StartX, I noticed how the Valley’s celebrated startup culture only featured a handful of women.

I thought back to all the remarkable women I had met at Stanford – amazing engineers, product gurus, designers, and marketers – I know that they would bring tremendous value to any startup, whether it be one they start or one they join. There are unique problems that can and should be tackled by the other half of the population, who are just as creative, strategic, and determined to solve the world’s consumer, enterprise, health, and energy problems as their male counterparts. And this is where I see the value in the BASES Women in Entrepreneurship Summit.

The summit is going to feature female founders who will lead intimate discussions with at most 15 participants about topics that they think are key discussion points: the things you should know as an entrepreneur, from splitting equity with co-founders to navigating the murky waters of defining your company’s culture and everything in between.

This naturally leads us to ask why we need a womens’ summit to begin with. And I think this statistic speaks for itself: Only 13 percent of VC deals went to women-led startups in 2013 (Pitchbook). I think this minority percentage stems less from an issue of competency or interest, but rather, starting a conversation around the unique challenges women entrepreneurs face. How do you pitch to a group of male investors and navigate any doubts they may have about the industry you are devising a solution for? How do you handle being a strong negotiator without coming across as overly aggressive? How do you build a network in a male-dominated venture capital scene? These are tough questions for anyone to address, let alone asking in front of 100 other people at one of Stanford’s several VC panel discussions and mixers throughout the year. We hope organizing groups of 15 entrepreneurial women in workshops led by female entrepreneurs will create an open and encouraging environment where women can freely ask questions, share their stories, and build meaningful relationships with one another.

I’m so glad that this spring we’re finally bringing together some of the most driven, entrepreneurial women across campus and the Valley to get to know each other and start a discussion about something that means so much to me.

We look forward to reading your applications, and can’t wait to see you in April!


Apply now at here at http://bit.ly/baseswomensummit

A Look Inside TreeHacks: Free Redbull & 124 Projects from Hack-Warriors

Written by Kameron Riley Butler

On the evening of February 28th, the opening ceremony of TreeHacks kicked off as hackers from more than 80 high schools and universities across the nation piled into CEMEX auditorium. The crows gave a warm welcome to keynote speaker Jeff Dean, and after describing his notably impressive work at Google, he left the eager hackers with a valuable inspiration: “Have fun, build something cool, and don’t stop learning, this weekend and beyond.” As the opening ceremony concluded, the hacker herd made its way back to the Arrillaga Alumni Center to embark upon the thirty-six hour endeavor that lay ahead. As the doors closed behind the last few stragglers, day one was upon us.

Day One:

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Photo Caption: The Treehacks community spares no time,diving straight into the hacking

Hackers and tinkerers from Stanford and beyond had claimed their thrones for the next three days and quickly set out to begin their masterpieces. If it was not the massive amounts of computers and hardware that was impressive, it was most definitely the plethora of food available to the 600+ coding crusaders (Seriously, unlimited free RedBull? Kind bars? Donuts? Yes please). Additionally, whether it was a cohort of students straight from The Farm or a last minute coalition of Harvard, Brown, and high school students, every group was seeping with energy and excitement. However, hacking was not the only highlight of this inaugural event. Nearly every hour, one of the 85 sponsors hosted a tech talk or workshop teaching some unmistakably valuable knowledge and tools to propel their ideas forward. It was dangerously easy to get caught up in the awe of the event with everything that the sponsors were offering (API’s, hardware for hacking, swag upon swag), however many teams were making headway by the midnight of the first night.

Day Two:

As the early morning light permeated the windows, it glistened upon the weary and worn. Those who managed to catch an inkling of rest slowly rose from their cocoons and wiped the drool from their cheeks. For the ambitious that sought rejuvenation departed to hike the Dish while the rest returned to their computers to join those most dedicated who had powered straight on through the night. Empty RedBulls rolled across the floor as the hackers climbed back into their seats, pushed away the scraps and wrappers that once contained the essentials of hacker-fuel, and dove back into their brilliant projects. The excitement and energy had sustained itself throughout the night; websites, apps, hardware hacks, and robotic devices were deep in development. As the tinkering continued, endless amounts of food came and went (The hackers were unbelievably well fed and nourished thanks to the amazing Treehacks team). Yoga and mobile workshops throughout the day gave Hackers room to stretch their limbs. As day two came to a close, the anticipation began to build as the remaining hours were ticking away.

Day 3

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Photo caption: The creators of DisTrac display their real-time disease epidemic tracker

The last morning of Treehacks brought a bittersweet feeling. It was a promise of long awaited sleep combined with the bleak disappointment that the event would all be over soon.It was the most important moment of the event as teams frantically made the finishing touches to their creations as the deadline grew nearer. As the clock reached 11:00 am, a synchronized sigh was released throughout the building, and 124 different projects were successfully submitted to be judged. At 12:00 pm, the 124 competing hacks displayed their creations to be seen by hackers and sponsors alike. The variety of projects was overwhelming and frankly, very humbling.

Projects ranged from the artistic to the ambitious: drones controlled by human gestures, 3D holographic visualizers using Microsoft’s Kinect, mood-driven music players, and so many more innovative ideas leveraging cutting edge technology. One team (MetricD) was in the process of creating an app that allowed for “an efficient way for doctors to monitor patient symptoms and recovery after surgery.” With a sleek and easy to use design, MetricD seemed to be a promising advancement in doctor-patient communication. Turn the corner and another team was engineering an interactive game that utilized the Oculus Rift to place the user in an animated world. To sum it up from its creators, it is essentially “Mazerunner meets Minecraft in the world of Oculus.”

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Photo caption: MAKKMat creators demo their smart workout mat that relays workout data directly to the user’s phone

Hacker Perspectives

Participants ranged from first-time hackers to the weekend hack-warriors, both male and female. Experienced hacker Chen Ye of Brown University (and coincidentally the Director of Design for HackatBrown) was very impressed, stating that the event was  “well run, fairly polished, and full of nice and friendly volunteers.” Chen was particularly impressed by the mentorship program offered during the event, regularly referred to as “the Uber of mentorship”. The effective mentor dispatch program made it easy for participants to receive rapid assistance on any topic, and majority of participants felt very well-supported.

Offering another perspective, Angela Kong and her team of female hackers admitted that they now “feel spoiled for future hackathons”. When asked for their opinion regarding the common gender imbalance of hackathon events, Angela and her team responded, “Being a female hacker is not a big deal. We feel very much a part of the TreeHacks community.” The TreeHacks team made a very clear initiative to shift this imbalance, and the diverse inclusivity of TreeHacks was a major step forward.

From the sponsor side, Tim Robinson and Barbara Castro of IBM were equally impressed with how interactive the students were. They were also especially excited to bring their technology to the students of all experience levels. “The event was very positive, and the students had a great energy level. We loved seeing all the sponsors come out, and we could not help notice the great cross section of students represented,” said Robinson.

First time hacker Patrick O’Grady found himself inspired by all of the innovative technology and expressed his desire to return next year. His most useful advice? “The potential of what you can create depends heavily on how sleepy you are.” So if you see someone walking around campus this week seeming a little low on energy, give them a hug to show that you understand.

TreeHacks Last Thoughts 

As the demo exo began to wind down and the top eight hacks were chosen for final judging  (Click here to read more about the top hacks of the event), it was safe to say that TreeHacks had delivered far more than promised. The record breaking event presented an endless variety of experiences for every make and model of hackers, but these experiences cannot be fully expressed in this blog. In order to truly understand the powerful environment of a hackathon, be sure to dive in next year!

Making TreeHacks Your First (And Not Last) Hackathon: The All-You-Can-Read Survival Guide

You’ve entered a strange world.  Everything in it looks familiar (unless you go to school in the Northeast, in which case the palm trees might be a little foreign), but it behaves quite differently. Time seems to pass irregularly, ebbing and flowing at random. Evolution must have pulled some switcheroos, as the people here are decidedly more centered on a few key traits than what you’re used to. Your senses are heightened.  For the moment, though, it’s all fun and games. And if you do it right, it will continue to be.

No, you’re not dreaming, and no, you’re not in some parallel universe.

You are at TreeHacks, your first hackathon.

If you’ve never hacked at a hackathon before, no doubt your first will bring some surprises. Hackathons aren’t exactly par for the course that is a college student’s life. Trying to find somewhere else that will house you, feed you, and give you more swag than you can carry for an entire 36 hours will probably result in a pretty fruitless search (if you’re wondering how exactly that’s possible, it’s all because of our awesome sponsors!  Check them out at http://www.treehacks.com!)  Looking for a place with the same density of computer programming talent and nerdy camaraderie will, in all likelihood, be equally futile.  But it’s all part of the magic.  Hackathons can be an incredible experience – just ask any college student who moonlights as a hackathon hacker, and they’ll launch into a long list of why they love what they do.  In time, you’ll get there too (if you haven’t already!).  We know that the first time around can be a whirlwind, though.  With that in mind, here’s your complete hackathon survival guide.

PREPARATION (or, an oddball packing list)

Luckily, hackathons are pretty easy to prepare for.  There’s the essentials:

  1. Your computer. As it turns out, it’s pretty hard to hack without one of these. And in case I need to say it, desktops are very much not advised.
  2. Whatever you want to plug in to your computer. If you’re a mouse person, bring it! If you’re an external keyboard person, have a ball (preferably a ball that fits in your backpack)! If you’re an external monitor (read: “big screen”) type of person, I might kindly advise restraining yourself. But hey, I’m not a cop.
  3. Whatever else you hack with. Picture yourself going to work on a long project or essay, and you’ll know what you need.
  4. Phone charger, preferably of the USB type. Not only will this help you if you decide to build an app, it’ll come in handy in case access to electrical outlets gets tight.
  5. Any hardware you want to hack on – arduinos and the like are definitely encouraged!

And then there’s the other stuff:

  1. Things having to do with sleep. Personally, I’m a blanket-and-the-floor type of guy, but I’ve also been known to fall asleep on large rocks, logs, and just about every moving vehicle in existence. The bottom line is, have a plan, and make it adaptable. Treat it like camping, if you want. Also, odds are you’ll be sleeping at some interesting times of the day and night, and that other people won’t necessarily be doing the same.  So if you’re one of those people that needs absolute silence and darkness to get some shuteye, bring a mask and some earplugs.
    1.  If you want to know more about hackathon sleeping, read this! 
  2. Clothes. This isn’t Stanford’s fashion week, but it’ll nice to have a change or two, especially right before judging starts.  Also make sure to have some layers and warmth – believe me when I say your body is not used to producing heat at 4 in the morning.
  3. Toiletries.  Just because you’re hacking doesn’t mean you can forget personal hygiene, ya filthy animal.  And even something small like brushing your teeth can make you feel like a new person when you need it most.

That should do it!  One more tip: try to keep your bag on the smaller side.  We promise we won’t try to sardine everyone, but 500 college kids in one place can only mean so much free space.  Bringing less will make your physical footprint a little smaller, and will give you less stuff to keep track of so you can keep your focus on hacking!

ARRIVING AT TREEHACKS (or, more nerds than you’ve ever seen in one place)

However you’re getting to the hackathon, you should do at least two things while en route:

  1. Brainstorm ideas for what to hack on.  If you can’t come up with anything, don’t sweat it – it’s not totally abnormal to only settle on an idea an hour or two in.  But knowing exactly what you’re going after when hacking starts will allow you to dive right in.
  2. SLEEP.  Like, as much as possible.  Depending on how hard you go during the hackathon, trust us, you’re going to need it.
    1. SLEEP.  Seriously.

When you get to Stanford, point yourself towards the Arrillaga Alumni Center.  Don’t just search for “Arrillaga” because, as any Stanford student will tell you, half our buildings are named that.

And now, for the fun part – the hackathon! When you get there, in all likelihood, it’ll be a little bit of a hot mess. Don’t worry, things will calm down as everybody settles in to their hacking.  Find the registration tables, wait in line a little, get checked in and get some swag, and then get ready!  Wander around, pick a table, and start getting set up to hack. People will be milling around, and you should too!  Make some new friends!  Say hi to some old ones!  Go check out the awesome sponsor companies – they’ll be able to give you the lowdown on any API’s they might have for you to hack on, or other cool things that could come in handy later. Worst comes to worst, you’ll probably come out of your sponsor tour with some free swag, and maybe a contact to hit up for an internship after the hackathon ends.

Eventually, make your way to the opening ceremony.  You’ll know it’s time because everybody else will be doing it!

HACKING (or, ironically the part about which I can give you the least amount of helpful advice)

This one’s mostly on you.  You’ve got 36 hours, go for it!  Try to pick a project that’ll be manageable, but challenging. Part of the fun of hackathons is learning something new!  Bonus points for projects that have good divisions of labor. Picking something that requires every piece to be built out in succession won’t make maximum use of the fact that you have a team to work with. Projects that have pieces that can be worked on in parallel are oftentimes better. Either way, find some form of version control and collaboration to use. Personally, I’d recommend github but use whatever you feel best on! And if you get stuck on a problem, take advantage of the mentorship system we’ll have in place to get help from someone who really knows their stuff.

While you’re hacking, don’t forget to take care of yourself. Eat when you need to, sleep when you need to. You’ll be surprised at how much more quickly you’ll solve problems when you’re fully alert and awake. Tracking down a missing semicolon can be just about impossible when you’re tired, and finding flaws in your logic will be miserable. You’ll make much shorter work of both when you’re rested, even if it’s only a short nap.

As far as sleeping (and yes, you’ll have to do it at least once during a 36 hour hackathon): sleeping at a hackathon is an art unto itself.  Suffice to say, make sure you do it.  For more tips, go here!

FINISHING UP (or, more scrambling than a plate of eggs)

It’s the 11th hour (or 35th, as it were), and things are (hopefully) just about finished.  Towards the end of the hackathon, you’ll want to start thinking about judging.  If you’re going for prizes, you’ll want to concentrate on the functionality that you’ll be able to show the judges. Nobody expects your hack to be perfect, but “Look what my app does!” goes a longer way than “It probably could do this, if we hadn’t spent 6 hours getting that div to line up a pixel to the right” (although don’t underestimate the appeal of showing where your app will go, given a little more time).

Old man Murphy can (and probably will) be a bit of a pain. If you’re like most people, the last few hours are where anything and everything will crash, maybe on the merge of various pieces.  For that reason, leave a little extra time for bringing the parts of your project together. And if it happens, don’t worry!  Do your best to sort everything out, but if you can’t, showing the separate pieces of your project to the judges isn’t the worst thing in the world.  This is also where tools like github come in handy.  If a stretch goal code change crashes everything, you can always revert back to your working version relatively painlessly.

Lastly, don’t forget to submit!  Get your hack out there!  Show the world!  Chances are, it’s pretty cool. 🙂  And putting it up on challengepost will leave a permanent trace for you to refer back to on things like resumes.

BREATHING (or, everything else that you haven’t done for the past 5-36 hours)

You should do this. You may not have a lot of time, but take a few seconds to relax. You’re done with your first hack (and almost your first hackathon!).  Be proud!  Whether you came a little short of your initial goals, or your hack turned out to be more than you could have ever dreamed of, rest easy for a few seconds.  Coding for as long as you have is no easy feat!

EXPO (or, thought you were bug free?  Nope.)

Get ready to show your hack off!  By this point, you’re probably going to be tired.  Maybe hungry.  Maybe both.  Keep it together, you’re almost there!  Set up wherever you’re assigned at the tables, and hang out.  When the judges come up to you, just show them what you’ve done.  Believe that what you’ve done is cool, and it’s that much more likely to come off as such.  If your hack freaks out as you’re showing the judge, don’t sweat it, just refresh and go for it again.  I find it best to keep your demo to a specific set of actions that you know will work well.  But hey, if you get the sudden urge to go rogue, I won’t stop you!

CLOSING CEREMONY AND DEMOS (or, how the heck did they do that…?)

Eventually, judging will come to a close.  Top projects will be picked.  If you’re one of them, congratulations!  Keep doing your thing!  If not, sit tight and chill.  Watch the top demos – they’ll be pretty good hacks, and might even inspire you for a future project.

AND FINALLY…HEADING HOME (or, your bed never felt this good)

Bask in the glow that comes with finishing your first hackathon. Sleep!  It may take a day or two to feel normal again, but that’s fine.  Wear your TreeHacks shirt the next day because, hey, your earned it!  And start looking for your next hackathon adventure.

See you at TreeHacks!

MORE RESOURCES:

These are some resources compiled by the TreeHacks team.  By no means do you have to read all or even any of them!

A. READINGS:

B. SETTING THINGS UP:

C. LEARNING THINGS

Even more resources…from text editors to wireframe tools to web hosting

Post by Alex Bertrand

BASES Startup Career Fair – 79 Companies. 900+ Students

Last Thursday, the BASES Startup Career Fair attracted 79 companies, featuring up and coming startups like Travelnuts to more established companies like Intuit. From 11am to 4 pm, over 900 students arrived at the lawn between Gates and Mudd to seek summer opportunities and even permanent positions with premier companies in the valley.

“The BASES Startup Career Fair is a great way to get yourself out there and find new opportunities,” said freshman Isabela Becerra. “Although this is my first career fair, and I didn’t know what to expect, there’s so much energy. I’m having a great time.”

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Having a lot of freshman in attendance was a new highlight in this year’s career fair. Although upperclassmen typically compose a majority of the demographic, many underclassmen have already started looking for summer opportunities.

“I’m pleasantly surprised by the number of freshman here. It’s great to see so many underclassmen interested in startups even early on,” said BASES Co-President Andrea Sy.

Sy also noted that this year, there were a lot of startups present that wanted to disrupt older industries like healthcare and construction.

“It’s fascinating to see what types of companies come to the BASES Startup Career Fair each year. I think it’s interesting to see how well the change in industry focus of attending startups correlate with the changing entrepreneurship ecosystem,” said Sy.

From a company’s standpoint, many were excited to be exposed to the incredible pipeline of talent: Stanford students. Shay Fidel, Stanford alumnus and head of growth operations at Plan Grid, “loves how Stanford fosters entrepreneurship,” in its students and “is trying to incorporate this in Plan Grid’s culture.” On the other hand, Oracle recruiter Amanda Johnson notes that “Stanford students are from so many different backgrounds,” so it makes her job “easier and exciting.”

“The BASES startup career fair was a great opportunity to engage with passionate students and get them excited about or mission. I love how Stanford students are both entrepreneurial and technically inclined,” said Upstart CTO Jonathan Eng.

After talking to a wide variety of companies, many students walked out feeling satisfied, some even getting interviews immediately afterward.

“After talking to a wide range of companies today, I already received an email about a potential opportunity. This event was truly worthwhile,” said freshman Natalie Ng.

For those of you who couldn’t attend the event, the startup career fair talent portal is still open for you to submit your resume! Click here. 

Complete list of all companies at the event can be found here

By Valerie Huynh

Coming Up This Quarter in BASES

At the heart of Stanford entrepreneurship is BASES. We are constantly working to provide unique opportunities to meet the best minds of the Valley and develop the professional skills necessary to become an entrepreneur. We are kicking off the year with some exciting events, and we would like to take a moment to share the highlights of this quarter with you.

BASES Career Fair

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Polish up your resume for the largest startup recruiting event at Stanford this Thursday, January 15 from 11 AM to 4pm on the lawn between Gates and Mudd Chemistry buildings. With more than 1200 attendees and 62 companies in 2014, the annual BASES Startup Career Fair is your chance to find a summer internship or network with the most innovative minds of the Valley. Don’t miss the opportunity to connect with some of the fastest growing companies, including familiar faces such as Snapchat and Pebble. Submit your resume here. Need some tips? Check out this article on advice for attending a career fair.

After meeting passionate entrepreneurs this week, look forward to BASES Startup Lunches later in the quarter to continue developing these professional relationships.

BASES Challenge Kickoff

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BASES Challenge is back with even more exciting opportunities to offer. If you are unfamiliar with BASES Challenge, it is our premier entrepreneurial competition that brings Stanford startups into the spotlight before industry leaders and investors. This year, Stanford-affiliated entrepreneurs will have a chance to compete for their share of the 100K in prize money and mentorship opportunities while gaining valuable networking opportunities, professional feedback, and immersion in a community of startups.

Not sold yet? To get more details, head over to our Kickoff on Monday, January 19th from 6:00-8:00 pm at Paul Brest Hall (RSVP here). The Kickoff will be headlined by our keynote speaker, Michael Baum, Founder & CEO of Founder.org. At the event, you can also interact with past finalists, meet our VC sponsors, and potentially find your own team with which to compete. Food is provided!

TreeHacks

This year, we are introducing Stanford’s first national hackathon. TreeHacks is gathering 500 of the most talented programmers, designers, tinkerers, and creators and bringing them together for 36 hours of pure creativity and collaboration. This capstone event will take place from Feb 20th-22nd, and is guaranteed to be a memorable experience for everyone that partakes.

Applications and registration will remain open for Stanford students until January 25th, so grab your sleeping bag and your hacking arsenal and register today.

New ETL

The new quarter brings new stories to the Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders (ETL) speaker series co-hosted by BASES and Stanford Technology Ventures Program (STVP). This quarter’s diverse lineup of speakers includes Shah Selbe, National Geographic Explorer, and John Collison, co-founder of Stripe. Stay updated on the blog for spotlights about the upcoming speakers! Check out the full lineup for the quarter here.

Enroll in ETL this quarter and engage with passionate leaders in business, finance, technology, and philanthropy on Wednesdays, 4:15pm – 5:30pm in NVIDIA Auditorium.

These are just some of the events that BASES will be running this winter, so stay on the lookout and be sure to keep up with BASES events as the quarter rolls along.

By Kameron Riley Butler and Vincent Chen

The Whereabouts of Wearables

With 2014 coming to the close, this means that BASES Challenge will open January 2015 to entrepreneurs all over the world.  This year’s wearable competitors will also be eligible for the newly proposed Samsung Wearables Prize, which will award a cash total of $3,000 to the winning company. To keep up with wearables in BASES history, we’ve compiled descriptions and updates for last year’s Wearables contestants for the Product Showcase challenge:

LumosTech

LumosTech is a sleep mask that eradicates jet lag while the wearer sleeps. The mask uses light pulses to shift the wearer’s circadian rhythm

LumosTech is currently developing a companion smartphone app that tracks user data and calculates optimal time to use the mask.

Napwell

Napwell is a napping mask designed to optimize (or #naptimize) napping. The mask gradually grows brighter to simulate a sunrise, so that wearers awaken naturally from their sleep with reduced sleep inertia.

Napwell can be pre-ordered for $100, and the company is currently leading a petition to reform workplace policies that discourage napping.

Echo Labs

Echo Labs technology is designed to monitor personal health by taking physiological indictors to track four categories: fuel, hydration, rest and recovery, and aerobic performance.

Echo Labs technology is patent-pending.

Toa Performance

Toa Performance focuses on apparel made of merino wool, which has anti-bacterial properties and wicks moisture from the body in a process called evaporative cooling.

SolPatch

SolPatch is a solar battery charger in the form of a button, and charges under direct or ambient light. The button can be worn, or attached on bags.

Deimos Defense

Deimos Defense focused on creating pepper spray that connects to smartphones. When used, the spray sends pictures and current location to a list of numbers pre-determined by the user.

HomeBase

HomeBase is a wireless gadget that allows users to remotely manage files across multiple devices.

Congratulations to the above companies for their new developments, and best of luck to all upcoming contestants!